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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
the circle so no has a clue. this happens again and again on spine, foreign-policy issues. he seems to be the last man to know. >> have you seen the latest poll? 42%. at 63% want to replace their own member of congress. the highest number ever recorded going back to 1982. peter hart said this is -- howard said this is a howard eel moment. moment. bute have seen the debate the american public have seen some ugly months in washington. down byrnment gets shut the republicans, that makes him mad. the issue goes away and all of a sudden they look at obamacare and the president not telling the whole truth and that infuriates them even further. i remained skeptical that even though 63% or 67% say throw the bums out including my own that this will happen. let's face it. are alwaysion rates in the 90 percentile. we are more likely to see that happen again unless we have a waves andave seen the only way we get to a wave where one party gets the brunt of the anger is if the government shuts down again. >> i think she makes very good points. that 63% number. throw them all out being the highest
mccain and senator gram are just on a warpath in general about the obama administration foreign policy in the middle east arguing it is failing .. in many dimensions. i think there are so many elements that they oppose, the one i would focus on for your viewers is, i think the job that they have done communicating with even traditional and close friends and allies, the uae, jordan would be two obvious examples, has not been what you would expect or indeed what the u.s. needs right now. this period of change in the region you have got to really stand close to all the people who matter in terms of the execution of foreign policy. >> rose:. >> maliki is not only a tyrant but from the beginning he is sectarian to the core, and that means this shiite divide and he has taken the war to the sunni minority in iraq and i think in a way has done sort of iran's bidding in that way but i think even if you set the war in syria aside, he would have an enormous problem on his hands because, on his hands because he has not -- he has not tried to be inclusive in the way that he has governed iraq, and
. let's close with free trade. you're on the board of an organization called just foreign policy, and that organization is offering a reward to anyone who can give it a copy of the negotiating text of the trans-pacific partnership agreement. any takers so far? >> not so far. so the idea here is that we do have people involved in negotiating process, they have access to at least parts of the deal. so the hope is that someone from good conscience, presumably more than, you know, the hope of getting a big reward, will feel, you know, feel the urge to make it public and, you know, the organization just foreign policy -- i'm on the board, but i don't play an active role in running it -- will be happy to then post on the web so that, you know, people across the country can really, you know, in all the countries will have an opportunity to see it. >> so in the last word here, both of you, the argument is this trans-pacific partnership agreement will ensure a freer flow of goods and greater prosperity. the other side of it really serves essentially what we know about it, the corporate in
states remains what he called the cornerstone of japan's foreign policy. >>> in the middle east, a leading egyptian satirist and television soviet to america's jon stewart yanked off the air. yousaf made fun of the leader. a huge cake adorned were the the image of the army chief. >>> tunisia barred from the davis cup. the international tins federation imposed the punishment after tunisian player was ordered not to play against another player. there is no room for prejudice in the sport. >>> and designated newborn to either male or female. that section of the birth certificate can be left blank. the idea, decide what to dop if the child is born with both male and female sex characteristics. estimates say that occurs in as many as 1 in 2,000 births. m for male, f for female or x, , for those calling themselves intersex. >>> and now back to that attack at l.a.x. yesterday. for more about its possible repurchase cushions joined from washington by rafi rhan, security expert and the former director of security a benghazi in tel aviv. the first thing most of asking this morning, what d
talking about his heart transplant surgery and foreign policy issues including trusting president obama. >> rose: you don't believe the president of the united states, do you. >> no. >> rose: you don't believe he has the best interest in the united states in terms oour national security in the middle east. >> i don't believe he does. >> rose: and you don't believe his word can gee trusted. >> correct. >> rose: that's serious. >> it certainly is. >> rose: to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> rose: in a democratic country. >> i think this president is doing damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. i've lived with this disease for 35 years. >> rose: you knew you would die. >> i knew i would die of heart disease. my father had and i expected to but when that time came i was at peace. there was no pain involved or discomfort. it was not frightening. i wanted to talk to my family about final arrangements. it was more difficult for them than
goals, foreign relationships, and her policy toward pyongyang. her departure for europe, she told the bbc that it is hard to trust the north korean leader, because he did not honor his promises, but that any provocation by pyongyang would carry a huge price tag, and her country would never accept a nuclear-armed north korea. >> we cannot repeat the vicious cycle of the past, where north korea's nuclear threats and provocations were met with and then followed by renewed provocations and threats. otherwise, north korea will continue to further advance its nuclear capability, and will come to a point where this situation will be even harder to crack. we will not be talking about whether north korea should or should not possess nuclear weapons. but their demands will creep to such an extent that they will be calling for arms reduction or arms talks. and it will be more difficult to deal with this issue. >> after decades of failed negotiations and nuclear tests, pyongyang is getting closer to a deliverable nuclear weapon. it's long-range rocket launch last year, and its most recent nuc
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
of foreign leaders, but it is awkward and may even force a change in policy. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last two years is the capacity continues to develop and expand which is why i'm initiating a review now to make sure that was a are able to do does not necessarily mean it is what they should be doing. >> washington's defense of the surveillance program is that everyone spies on everyone and a ay -- anyway but this is question of scale. nobody does a as big as america. >> i spoke with democratic congressman brad sherman who sits on the foreign affairs committee. mr. sherman, thank you for joining me. did you hear anything in the hearings today that justified to you what the surveillance programs might have been doing think you have a series of interconnected and somewhat reckless decisions. of first was to give many the 500,000 people a security clearance access to far more information than they would have had before we began chanting that we need to connect the dots so that everyone needs to have access to everything. engage in expect to the secret activi
on. the reason why it's important is because it is a policy issue that has very broad implications. it could put the united states in a difficult position. >> woodruff: yesterday dianne feinstein expressed outrage over spying on friendly foreign leaders. she says white house officials assured her it's going to end. the white house said only that a review is underway. for his part, the president declined to address reports that he did not learn of the practice until last summer. instead, he told the fusion news channel -- >> well, first of all, i'm not confirming a bunch of assumptions that have been made in the press. there are strict law about what we do internally and that was the initial concern about the snoend disclosures. internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operate. >> woodruff: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of lawmakers called today for an end to most of the n.s.a.'s surveillance with phone records and e-mails. one of those lawmakers calling for limits to spying is wisconsin republican jim sensenbrenner chairman of the house crime and te
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)